The Nature of Confidence

Clinging to what is good and resisting what is bad is a guaranteed rollercoaster ride.

Trying to control people or circumstances to feel secure leads to more insecurity because confidence is not an external matter. As counterintuitive as it may seem, relinquishing the need for control unveils confidence.

Consider this: (more…)

What are School Selfies Teaching Children?

I get it – it’s the era of technology. And I get it – kids love it.

But what I don’t get it is that in light of all the research about brain development, social development, and the direct link to depression and anxiety to the use of technology (namely social media), why are school leaders leading this effort of posting selfies with students on social media?

I’m confused and curious about it. (more…)

How To “Have It All” Without Having It All – Get Rich Now

Flying across the still waters of the lake by jet ski at sun-up last weekend, I caught myself in mid-thought, “When I retire, I’m going to…”

“Woah. STOP. RIGHT. THERE,” I told myself.

A few years ago I’d read an article by a man who told of his vacation with his wife and kids to Hawaii, and while standing on the white sandy beach with the crimsons and pinks of the sunset splashed across the horizon in front them, his wife said, “I can’t wait to come back here next year.” The husband was taken back by this comment. Why all the wishing and waiting to come back when you’re here right now? (more…)

Building Silence into Your Schedule is Essential

In 1964 Simon & Garfunkel brought awareness to the sound of silence. In their musical rendition, it was the loudness of silence that caught their attention: no one dared disturb the sound of silence.

In 2017, however,  there is a bombardment of noise in which silence could now be a coveted answer.

Noise is perpetuating the inability to concentrate, create, and communicate in a way that promotes community. Everyone has a private opinion which can now be aired publically.

Why make time for silence? (more…)

You Know You’ve Peaked when Your Focus is You and not the Mountain

You know when your study of the brain has peaked when you hug your loved ones and say “oxytocin” instead of “I love you.”  –Rachel Thalmann

The brain is an amazing machine, and I’ve noticed the more that people understand the way in which it works, the more in control of themselves they feel.

I was nine the first time I skied down a mountain. I learned to snow plow – to point my toes together and put pressure on the inside edges of both skies to control my speed. This method works for beginners, particularly children. It worked again when I was 13, and kinda worked when I was 30, and by last year at 38, I wanted to learn a new way to be on skis. So this year I did…and it came with navigating myself more than navigating a mountain. (more…)